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Group decries apps for babies

 
 
In this 2011 file photo, Frankie Thevenot, 3, plays with an iPad in his bedroom at his home in Metairie, La.  In early August 2013, the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood urged federal investigators to examine the marketing practices of Fisher-Price's and Open Solution's mobile apps.
In this 2011 file photo, Frankie Thevenot, 3, plays with an iPad in his bedroom at his home in Metairie, La. In early August 2013, the Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood urged federal investigators to examine the marketing practices of Fisher-Price's and Open Solution's mobile apps.
Gerald Herbert / AP

Associated Press

Smartphones don't make smart babies, an advocacy group declares in a complaint to the government about mobile apps that claim to help babies learn.

The Campaign for a Commercial-Free Childhood, whose allegations against Baby Einstein videos eventually led to nationwide consumer refunds, is urging federal regulators to examine the marketing practices of Fisher-Price's “Laugh & Learn” mobile apps and Open Solutions' games, such as “Baby Hear and Read” and “Baby First Puzzle.” 

The Boston-based group says developers are trying to dupe parents into thinking apps are more educational than entertaining. It's the campaign's first complaint to the Federal Trade Commission against the mobile app industry as part of its broader push to hold businesses accountable for marketing claims about their technology to very young children and their parents. 

“Everything we know about brain research and child development points away from using screens to educate babies,” said Susan Linn, the group's director. “The research shows that machines and screen media are a really ineffective way of teaching a baby language. What babies need for healthy brain development is active play, hands-on creative play and face-to-face” interaction. 

The American Academy of Pediatrics discourages any electronic “screen time” for infants and toddlers under 2, while older children should be limited to one to two hours a day. It cites one study that found infant videos can delay language development, and warns that no studies have documented a benefit of early viewing. 

In a statement provided to The Associated Press, Open Solutions said it agrees that electronics are not a substitute for human interaction. But it noted the many positive reviews its apps have received by customers. 

“We also don't say, 'Get this game and let it teach your child everything,' " wrote the company, based in Bratislava, Slovakia. “We assume (the) child is playing the game with parent/sister/baby sitter. We think we have apps that can help parents with babies, either by entertaining babies or help them see new things, animals, hear their sounds, etc.” 

Fisher-Price of East Aurora, N.Y., which the AP contacted by phone and email, did not respond to questions. 

Linn's group alleges that the companies violate truth-in-advertising laws when they claim to “teach” babies skills. For example, Fisher-Price claims that its Laugh & Learn “Where's Puppy's Nose?” app can teach a baby about body parts and language, while its “Learning Letters Puppy” app educates babies on the alphabet and counting to 10. Open Solutions says its mobile apps offer a “new and innovative form of education” by allowing babies to “practice logic and motor skills.” 

“Given that there's no evidence that (mobile apps are) beneficial, and some evidence that it may actually be harmful, that's concerning,” Linn said. 

According to the Pew Internet and American Life Project, more than half of American adults own a smartphone while about one-third of adults own a tablet. With the number of mobile devices on the rise, mobile software applications have become lucrative money makers. Even apps that are downloaded for free will often collect personal information from a consumer that can then be sold to marketers. 

Miami Herald

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